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Eczema vaccinatum resulting from the transmission of vaccinia virus from a smallpox vaccinee: An investigation of potential fomites in the home environment

Poxvirus and Rabies Branch, Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.49). 12/2008; 27(3):375-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.11.019
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT On March 3, 2007, a 2-year-old boy was hospitalized with eczema vaccinatum. His two siblings, one with eczema, were subsequently removed from the home. Swabs of household items obtained on March 13th were analyzed for orthopoxvirus DNA signatures with real-time PCR. Virus culture was attempted on positive specimens. Eight of 25 household samples were positive by PCR for orthopoxvirus; of these, three yielded viable vaccinia virus in culture. Both siblings were found to have serologic evidence of orthopoxvirus exposure. These findings have implications for smallpox preparedness, especially in situations where some household members are not candidates for vaccination.

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    • "Routine vaccination was stopped in most countries in the early 1970's due to the poor safety record of the vaccine, live Vaccinia virus (VV). Vaccination is contraindicated for many individuals, including those who have inflammatory skin conditions, such as eczema, and those that are immunocompromised or pregnant (Lederman et al., 2009). In a recent vaccine trial, it was reported that 1 out of every 450 of those vaccinated had a serious adverse vaccine reaction (Casey et al., 2005), and vaccine trials were stopped after reports of increased adverse cardiac events following vaccination (Eckart et al., 2004; Upfal and Cinti, 2004). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
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