Article

Risk factors of surgical site infection after hepatectomy for liver cancers.

National Cancer Center East Hospital, 6-5-1, Chiba, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8577, Japan.
World Journal of Surgery (Impact Factor: 2.23). 12/2008; 33(2):312-7. DOI: 10.1007/s00268-008-9831-2
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Risk factors of surgical site infection (SSI) after hepatectomy under the guideline of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are not well examined.
Hospital records of consecutive patients who underwent hepatectomy without biliary reconstruction for liver cancers were reviewed retrospectively. Prophylactic antibiotics were given to patients just before skin incision and every 3 hours during the operations. Clinicopathological factors were compared between patients who developed SSI and those without it.
There were 405 patients identified, and the incidence of SSI was 23 cases (5.8%). In multivariate analysis, intraoperative bowel injury, blood loss >2000 ml, and age older than 65 years were significant risk factors of SSI after hepatectomy.
Prophylactic antibiotics were necessary only during the operation for most patients who underwent hepatectomy without biliary reconstruction. However, patients with intraoperative bowel injury, blood loss >2000 ml, and age older than 65 years are at risk to develop SSI and might need additional administration of prophylactic antibiotics after surgery.

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