Conjunctival hyperaemia with the use of latanoprost versus other prostaglandin analogues in patients with ocular hypertension or glaucoma: A meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials

Medical Unit, Pfizer Spain, Avda de Europa 20-B, Parque Empresarial de la Moraleja, 28108 Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain.
The British journal of ophthalmology (Impact Factor: 2.98). 11/2008; 93(3):316-21. DOI: 10.1136/bjo.2007.135111
Source: PubMed


To conduct a meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials (RCTs) in order to evaluate the development of conjunctival hyperaemia after the use of latanoprost versus travoprost and bimatoprost, in patients with ocular hypertension or glaucoma.
In order to identify the potentially relevant RCTs, a systematic literature retrieval was conducted in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (1995-April 2007) databases The outcome measure was the appearance of conjunctival hyperaemia during the study. Statistical analyses included the calculation of odds ratio (OR) and its respective confidence interval, along with intertrial statistical heterogeneity. Publication bias was evaluated through a funnel plot, and a sensitivity analysis was also performed.
In total, 13 RCTs involving 2222 patients with ocular hypertension or glaucoma were included, five comparing latanoprost versus travoprost, seven comparing latanoprost versus bimatoprost and one comparing latanoprost versus travoprost and bimatoprost. The combined results showed that latanoprost produced lower occurrence of conjunctival hyperaemia than both travoprost (OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.67, p<0.0001) and bimatoprost (OR = 0.32; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.42, p<0.0001). No significant heterogeneity was found between the included RCTs. There was no evidence of publication bias. In the sensitivity analysis performed, none of the clinical trials included in this meta-analysis has an important impact in the global estimation of OR.
According to available data, the use of latanoprost is associated with a lower incidence of conjunctival hyperaemia when compared with travoprost and bimatoprost in the treatment of patients with ocular hypertension or glaucoma.

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Available from: Jose M Martínez-de-la-Casa, May 16, 2014
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    • "Conjunctival hyperemia was seen most frequently with bimatoprost (24.3%) when compared to the other study medications. Honrubia et al. [18] also reported a similar finding in their meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Furthermore, DuBiner et al. [19] also reported other events such as dryness of the eye and discomfort, with bimatoprost use. "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To compare the efficacy and safety of latanoprost, bimatoprost, travoprost and timolol in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Methods This was a prospective study conducted at a tertiary-care centre. One hundred and forty patients with newly diagnosed primary open angle glaucoma were randomly assigned to treatment with latanoprost (0.005%), bimatoprost (0.03%), travoprost (0.004%) or timolol gel (0.5%); 35 patients were assigned to each group. All patients were followed for 2, 6, and 12 weeks. The main outcome measure studied was the change in IOP at week 12 from the baseline values. Safety measures included recording of adverse events. Results The mean IOP reduction from baseline at week 12 was significantly more with bimatoprost (8.8 mmHg, 35.9%) than with latanoprost (7.3 mmHg, 29.9%), travoprost (7.6 mmHg, 30.8%) or timolol (6.7 mmHg, 26.6%) (ANOVA and Student's t-tests, p < 0.001). Among the prostaglandins studied, bimatoprost produced a maximum reduction in IOP (-2.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.25 to -3.18) followed by travoprost (-1.27; 95% CI, -0.81 to -1.27) and latanoprost (-1.25; 95% CI, -0.79 to -1.71); these values were significant when compared to timolol at week 12 (Bonferroni test, p < 0.001). Latanoprost and travoprost were comparable in their ability to reduce IOP at each patient visit. Ocular adverse-events were found in almost equal proportion in patients treated with bimatoprost (41.3%) and travoprost (41.9%), with a higher incidence of conjunctival hyperemia (24.1%) seen in the bimatoprost group. Timolol produced a significant drop in heart rate (p < 0.001) at week 12 when compared to the baseline measurements. Conclusions Bimatoprost showed greater efficacy when compared to the other prostaglandins, and timolol was the most efficacious at lowering the IOP. Conjunctional hyperemia was mainly seen with bimatoprost. However, the drug was tolerated well and found to be safe.
    Korean Journal of Ophthalmology 10/2014; 28(5):399-407. DOI:10.3341/kjo.2014.28.5.399
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    • "In the initial stages of treatment with prostaglandin analogs, patients sometimes have intense conjunctival hyperemia, but this gradually decreases over time. A meta-analyses in several systematic reviews22 has shown that conjunctival hyperemia occurred significantly less often with latanoprost than with travoprost (odds ratio =0.512) or with bimatoprost (odds ratio =0.32).22 In other meta-analyses based systematic reviews on patient-reported data, conjunctival hyperemia was more likely to occur with bimatoprost than with latanoprost (relative risk =1.70), or travoprost (relative risk =1.19).23 "
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    ABSTRACT: Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use.
    Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) 05/2014; 8:903-913. DOI:10.2147/OPTH.S44708
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    • "In general tafluprost seems to have fewer toxic reactions associated with it than the other major classes of glaucoma drugs.4,14 Although at least one group disputes this.33 Future research will confirm or deny the hypothesis. "
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    ABSTRACT: Tafluprost is an FP receptor antagonist that has been shown in clinical studies in Europe and Japan to be extremely useful in treating elevated intraocular pressure and glaucoma. The drug is well tolerated and appears to be at least equal in effectiveness and perhaps superior to other protanoids for routine use comparison to be superior to other treatments for the elevated IOP as the side effects and other related symptomology appear to be less, while maintaining a level of pressure control for prolonged periods.
    Opthalmology and Eye Diseases 01/2011; 3:13-9. DOI:10.4137/OED.S4253
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