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Evidence-based behavioral treatment of obesity in children and adolescents.

The Children's Weight Clinic PO Box 28533, Edinburgh EH4 2WW, Scotland, UK.
Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America (Impact Factor: 2.88). 02/2009; 18(1):189-98. DOI: 10.1016/j.chc.2008.07.014
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Obesity is the most common childhood disease and is widely acknowledged as having become a global epidemic. Well-recognized health consequences of childhood obesity exist, both during childhood and adulthood, affecting health and psychological and economic welfare. The importance of finding effective strategies for the management of childhood obesity has international significance with the publication of various expert reports and evidence-based guidelines in recent years.

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