Article

Research on the diffusion of evidence-based treatments within substance abuse treatment: A systematic review

Chestnut Health Systems, 448 Wylie Dr., Normal, IL 61761, USA.
Journal of substance abuse treatment (Impact Factor: 2.9). 12/2008; 36(4):376-99. DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2008.08.004
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT This article provides a comprehensive review of research studies that have examined the diffusion of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) within the field of substance abuse treatment. Sixty-five research studies were identified and were grouped into one of three major classifications: attitudes toward EBTs, adoption of EBTs, and implementation of EBTs. This review suggests significant progress has been made with regard to the advancement of the fields' knowledge about attitudes toward and the extent to which specific EBTs have been adopted in practice, as well as with regard to the identification of organizational factors related to EBT adoption. In an effort to advance the substance abuse treatment field toward evidence-based diffusion practices, recommendations are made for greater use of methodologically rigorous experimental or quasi-experimental designs, psychometrically sound instruments, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data collection.

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Available from: Bryan R Garner, Jul 28, 2014
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