Article

Mask Proteins Are Cofactors of Yorkie/YAP in the Hippo Pathway

Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY, UK.
Current biology: CB (Impact Factor: 9.92). 01/2013; 23(3). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2012.11.061
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Hippo signaling pathway acts via the Yorkie (Yki)/Yes-associated protein (YAP) transcriptional coactivator family to control tissue growth in both Drosophila and mammals [1-3]. Yki/YAP drives tissue growth by activating target gene transcription, but how it does so remains unclear. Here we identify Mask as a novel cofactor for Yki/YAP. We show that Drosophila Mask forms a complex with Yki and its binding partner, Scalloped (Sd), on target-gene promoters and is essential for Yki to drive transcription of target genes and tissue growth. Furthermore, the stability and subcellular localization of both Mask and Yki is coregulated in response to various stimuli. Finally, Mask proteins are functionally conserved between Drosophila and humans and are coexpressed with YAP in a wide variety of human stem/progenitor cells and tumors.

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