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Flow cytometric assessment of cord blood as an alternative strategy for population-based screening of severe combined immunodeficiency

Child Health Research Unit, Barwon Health, Department of Medicine, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (Impact Factor: 11.25). 01/2013; 131(4). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2012.09.039
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    ABSTRACT: The modern environment is associated with an increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Mounting evidence implicates environmental exposures, experienced early in life (including in utero), in the aetiology of many NCDs, though the cellular/molecular mechanism(s) underlying this elevated risk across the life course remain unclear. Epigenetic variation has emerged as a candidate mediator of such effects. The Barwon Infant Study (BIS) is a population-derived birth cohort study (n = 1074 infants) with antenatal recruitment, conducted in the south-east of Australia (Victoria). BIS has been designed to facilitate a detailed mechanistic investigation of development within an epidemiological framework. The broad objectives are to investigate the role of specific environmental factors, gut microbiota and epigenetic variation in early-life development, and subsequent immune, allergic, cardiovascular, respiratory and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Participants have been reviewed at birth and at 1, 6, 9 and 12 months, with 2- and 4-year reviews under way. Biological samples and measures include: maternal blood, faeces and urine during pregnancy; infant urine, faeces and blood at regular intervals during the first 4 years; lung function at 1 month and 4 years; cardiovascular assessment at 1 month and 4 years; skin-prick allergy testing and food challenge at 1 year; and neurodevelopmental assessment at 9 months, 2 and 4 years. Data access enquiries can be made at [www.barwoninfantstudy.org.au] or via [peter.vuillermin@deakin.edu.au]. © The Author 2015; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.
    International Journal of Epidemiology 03/2015; DOI:10.1093/ije/dyv026 · 9.20 Impact Factor
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    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.09.040 · 11.25 Impact Factor