Article

Flow cytometric assessment of cord blood as an alternative strategy for population-based screening of severe combined immunodeficiency

Child Health Research Unit, Barwon Health, Department of Medicine, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia
The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology (Impact Factor: 11.25). 01/2013; 131(4). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2012.09.039
Source: PubMed
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    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2012.09.040
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