Article

Kedrin, D. et al. Intravital imaging of metastatic behavior through a mammary imaging window. Nat. Methods 5, 1019-1021

Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461, USA.
Nature Methods (Impact Factor: 25.95). 12/2008; 5(12):1019-21. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1269
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We report a technique to evaluate the same tumor microenvironment over multiple intravital imaging sessions in living mice. We optically marked individual tumor cells expressing photoswitchable proteins in an orthotopic mammary carcinoma and followed them for extended periods through a mammary imaging window. We found that two distinct microenvironments in the same orthotopic mammary tumor affected differently the invasion and intravasation of tumor cells.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Bojana Gligorijevic, Aug 28, 2015
2 Followers
 · 
225 Views
  • Source
    • "Therefore the information obtained with these methods, is only a partial picture of the tumor environment. Moreover, many intravital approaches require an optical window, surgically placed on the tumor; an invasive procedure, which also provides a partial view of the tumor microenvironment [20]. Optical coherence tomography, implemented in the frequency domain, has been also employed for imaging vasculature in the tumor microenvironment [21], but it was capable of imaging vessels up to a depth of only ~ 1 mm so far. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is a central cancer hallmark, necessary for supporting tumor growth and metastasis. In vivo imaging of angiogenesis is commonly applied, to understand dynamic processes in cancer development and treatment strategies. However, most radiological modalities today assess angiogenesis based on indirect mechanisms, such as the rate of contrast enhancement after contrast agent administration. We studied the performance of raster-scan optoacoustic mesoscopy (RSOM), to directly reveal the vascular network supporting melanoma growth in vivo, at 50 MHz and 100 MHz, through several millimeters of tumor depth. After comparing the performance at each frequency, we recorded, for the first time, high-resolution images of melanin tumor vasculature development in vivo, over a period of several days. Image validation was provided by means of cryo-slice sections of the same tumor after sacrificing the mice. We show how optoacoustic (photoacoustic) mesoscopy reveals a potentially powerful look into tumor angiogenesis, with properties and features that are markedly different than other radiological modalities. This will facilitate a better understanding of tumor's angiogenesis, and the evaluation of treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Neoplasia 03/2015; 17(2):208-214. DOI:10.1016/j.neo.2014.12.010 · 5.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "temporal context, which can be difficult to do with traditional ex vivo studies, but also can capture the nature of the biological microenvironment including signaling, chemical and physical factors which is currently not feasible to do with a purely in vitro system. There have been many groups that have used windowed devices to gain access into parts of the body such as to chronically image mammary tissue [1] [2], spinal cord [3] [4], and neural cortex [5] [6] [7]. In vivo cranial window imaging has become popular recently because of its ease of implantation and powerful capabilities of being able to image directly into the brain in a chronic and even awake and behaving animal [8]. "
    Conference Paper: Peripheral Nerve Window
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic imaging of the peripheral nervous system with contemporary techniques requires repetitive surgical procedures to reopen an area of interest in order to see underlying biological processes over time. The recurrence of surgical openings on an animal increases trauma, stress, and risk of infection. Such effects can greatly lessen the physiological relevance of any data recorded in this manner. In order to bypass repetitive surgery, a Peripheral Nerve Window (PNW) device has been created for chronic in vivo imaging purposes. Intravital imaging window devices have been used previously to image parts of the rodent model such as the brain, spinal cord, and mammary tissue, but currently have not been used in the peripheral nervous system because of lack of bone anchoring and access to deep nerve tissue. We demonstrate a novel surgical technique in a rat which transposes the sciatic nerve above the surrounding muscle tissue allowing the PNW access to an 8mm section of the nerve. Subsequent days of observation revealed increased vasculature development primarily around the nerve, showing that this preparation can be used to image nerve tissue and surrounding vasculature for up to one week post-implantation.
    IEEE 2014; 08/2014
  • Source
    • "temporal context, which can be difficult to do with traditional ex vivo studies, but also can capture the nature of the biological microenvironment including signaling, chemical and physical factors which is currently not feasible to do with a purely in vitro system. There have been many groups that have used windowed devices to gain access into parts of the body such as to chronically image mammary tissue [1] [2], spinal cord [3] [4], and neural cortex [5] [6] [7]. In vivo cranial window imaging has become popular recently because of its ease of implantation and powerful capabilities of being able to image directly into the brain in a chronic and even awake and behaving animal [8]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic imaging of the peripheral nervous system with contemporary techniques requires repetitive surgical procedures to reopen an area of interest in order to see underlying biological processes over time. The recurrence of surgical openings on an animal increases trauma, stress, and risk of infection. Such effects can greatly lessen the physiological relevance of any data recorded in this manner. In order to bypass repetitive surgery, a Peripheral Nerve Window (PNW) device has been created for chronic in vivo imaging purposes. Intravital imaging window devices have been used previously to image parts of the rodent model such as the brain, spinal cord, and mammary tissue, but currently have not been used in the peripheral nervous system because of lack of bone anchoring and access to deep nerve tissue. We demonstrate a novel surgical technique in a rat which transposes the sciatic nerve above the surrounding muscle tissue allowing the PNW access to an 8mm section of the nerve. Subsequent days of observation revealed increased vasculature development primarily around the nerve, showing that this preparation can be used to image nerve tissue and surrounding vasculature for up to one week post-implantation.
Show more