Article

Two Supporting Factors Greatly Improve the Efficiency of Human iPSC Generation

Cell stem cell (Impact Factor: 22.15). 12/2008; 3(5):475-9. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2008.10.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Human fibroblasts can be induced into pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the reprogramming efficiency is quite low. Here, we screened a panel of candidate factors in the presence of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC in an effort to improve the reprogramming efficiency from human adult fibroblasts. We found that p53 siRNA and UTF1 enhanced the efficiency of iPSC generation up to 100-fold, even when the oncogene c-MYC was removed from the combinations.

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Available from: Chun Liu, Jul 15, 2014
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