Article

Sub-wavelength image manipulating through compensated anisotropic metamaterial prisms

Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China.
Optics Express (Impact Factor: 3.49). 11/2008; 16(22):18057-66. DOI: 10.1364/OE.16.018057
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Based on the concept of sub-wavelength imaging through compensated bilayer of anisotropic metamaterials (AMMs), which is an expansion of the perfect lens configuration, we propose two dimensional prism pair structures of compensated AMMs that are capable of manipulating two dimensional sub-wavelength images. We demonstrate that through properly designed symmetric and asymmetric compensated prism pair structures planar image rotation with arbitrary angle, lateral image shift, as well as image magnification could be achieved with sub-wavelength resolution. Both theoretical analysis and full wave electromagnetic simulations have been employed to verify the properties of the proposed prism structures. Utilizing the proposed AMM prisms, flat optical image of objects with sub-wavelength features can be projected and magnified to wavelength scale allowing for further optical processing of the image by conventional optics.

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