Article

The Cure for Cholera - Improving Access to Safe Water and Sanitation

From the School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University, Washington, DC (R.J.W.)
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 54.42). 01/2013; 368(7). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1214179
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Whenever epidemics of cholera occur, the global public health community is energized. Experts meet, guidelines for control are reviewed and reissued, and new and modified interventions are proposed and promoted. In the past two decades, these things happened after cholera appeared in Latin America in 1991, in the wake of the Rwandan genocide and the ensuing refugee crisis in Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo) in 1994, in Zimbabwe in 2008, and in October 2010, at the onset of the ongoing epidemic in Haiti (see article by Barzilay et al.). But even when it is not covered in the news . . .

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