Article

Combination Therapy Using Monoclonal Antibodies against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) G Glycoprotein Protects from RSV Disease in BALB/c Mice

University of Iowa, United States of America
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 12/2012; 7(12):e51485. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051485
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Therapeutic options to control respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are limited, thus development of new therapeutics is high priority. Previous studies with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) reactive to an epitope proximal to the central conserved region (CCR) of RSV G protein (mAb 131-2G) showed therapeutic efficacy for reducing pulmonary inflammation RSV infection in BALB/c mice. Here, we show a protective effect in RSV-infected mice therapeutically treated with a mAb (130-6D) reactive to an epitope within the CCR of G protein, while treatment with a mAb specific for a carboxyl G protein epitope had no effect. Combined treatment with mAbs 130-6D and 131-2G significantly decreased RSV-associated pulmonary inflammation compared to either antibody alone. The results suggest that anti-RSV G protein mAbs that react at or near the CCR and can block RSV G protein-mediated activities are effective at preventing RSV disease and may be an effective strategy for RSV therapeutic treatment.

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