Article

Technology and informatics competencies.

University of Utah, College of Nursing, 10 South 2000 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA.
Nursing Clinics of North America (Impact Factor: 0.43). 01/2009; 43(4):507-21, v. DOI: 10.1016/j.cnur.2008.06.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Health care information technology has the potential to achieve clinical transformation. Nursing students and faculty must be able to use these tools effectively to use data and knowledge in their practice. This article describes informatics competencies for four levels of nurses (beginning nurses, experienced nurses, informatics specialists, and informatics innovators). Recent activities to include informatics competencies in program outcomes are also described in relation to the clinical nurse leader, doctorate of nursing practice, and baccalaureate essentials documents.

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