Association of Blood Transfusion With Increased Mortality in Myocardial Infarction A Meta-analysis and Diversity-Adjusted Study Sequential Analysis

Archives of internal medicine (Impact Factor: 17.33). 12/2012; 173(2):1-8. DOI: 10.1001/2013.jamainternmed.1001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Background:
The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists.

A systematic search of studies published between January 1, 1966, and March 31, 2012, was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. English-language studies comparing blood transfusion with no blood transfusion or a liberal vs restricted blood transfusion strategy were identified. Two study authors independently reviewed 729 originally identified titles and abstracts and selected 10 for analysis. Study title, follow-up period, blood transfusion strategy, and mortality outcomes were extracted manually from all selected studies, and the quality of each study was assessed using the strengthening Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology checklist.

Studies of blood transfusion strategy in anemia associated with myocardial infarction were abstracted, as well as all-cause mortality rates at the longest available follow-up periods for the individual studies. Pooled effect estimates were calculated with random-effects models. Analyses of blood transfusion in myocardial infarction revealed increased all-cause mortality associated with a strategy of blood transfusion vs no blood transfusion during myocardial infarction (18.2% vs 10.2%) (risk ratio, 2.91; 95% CI, 2.46-3.44; P < .001), with a weighted absolute risk increase of 12% and a number needed to harm of 8 (95% CI, 6-17). Multivariate meta-regression revealed that blood transfusion was associated with a higher risk for mortality independent of baseline hemoglobin level, nadir hemoglobin level, and change in hemoglobin level during the hospital stay. Blood transfusion was also significantly associated with a higher risk for subsequent myocardial infarction (risk ratio, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.06-3.93; P = .03).

Blood transfusion or a liberal blood transfusion strategy compared with no blood transfusion or a restricted blood transfusion strategy is associated with higher all-cause mortality rates. A practice of routine or liberal blood transfusion in myocardial infarction should not be encouraged but requires investigation in a large trial with low risk for bias.

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Available from: Jørn Wetterslev, Sep 28, 2015
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    • "dChatterjee et al. [51] completed a systematic review that included the studies marked byd in this table, plus a small RCT conducted by Cooper et al. [52]. Overall, the risk ratio of death in transfused patients versus controls was 2.91 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.46 to 3.44), but there was a very significant heterogeneity (I 2  = 92%). "
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