A versatile genome-scale PCR-based pipeline for high-definition DNA FISH

1] Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. [4].
Nature Methods (Impact Factor: 32.07). 12/2012; 10(2). DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2306
Source: PubMed


We developed a cost-effective genome-scale PCR-based method for high-definition DNA FISH (HD-FISH). We visualized gene loci with diffraction-limited resolution, chromosomes as spot clusters and single genes together with transcripts by combining HD-FISH with single-molecule RNA FISH. We provide a database of over 4.3 million primer pairs targeting the human and mouse genomes that is readily usable for rapid and flexible generation of probes.

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