Dataset

DR.RATH

0 Followers
 · 
105 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The authors review more than 250 journal articles and books to establish what is and should be known about how advertising affects the consumer-how it works. They first deduce a taxonomy of models, discuss the theoretical principles of each class of models, and summarize their empirical findings. They then synthesize five generalizations about how advertising works and propose directions for further research. Advertising effects are classified into intermediate effects, for example, on consumer beliefs and attitudes, and behavioral effects, which relate to purchasing behavior, for example, on brand choice. The generalizations suggest that there is little support for any hierarchy, in the sense of temporal sequence, of effects. The authors propose that advertising effects should be studied in a space, with affect, cognition, and experience as the three dimensions. Advertising's positioning in this space should be determined by context, which reflects advertising's goal diversity, product category, competition, other aspects of mix, stage of product life cycle, and target market.
    Journal of Marketing 01/1999; 63(1-1):26-43. DOI:10.2307/1251999 · 5.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Past research suggests that marketing communications create expectations that influence the way consumers subsequently learn from their product experiences. Since postexperience information can also be important and is widespread for established goods and services, it is appropriate to ask about the cognitive effects of these efforts. The postexperience advertising situation is conceptualized here as an instant source-forgetting problem where the language and imagery from the recently presented advertising become confused with consumers' own experiential memories. It is suggested that, through a reconstructive memory process, this advertising information affects how and what consumers remember. Consumers may come to believe that their past product experience had been as suggested by the advertising. Over time this postexperience advertising information can become incorporated into the brand schema and influence future product decisions. Copyright 1999 by the University of Chicago.
    Journal of Consumer Research 03/1999; 25(4):319-34. DOI:10.1086/209542 · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates whether the tendency to buy store brand is category specific, or an enduring consumer trait. We develop a multicategory brand-choice model with a factor-analytic structure on the covariance matrix of the coefficients. The methodology allows us to elicit the basic latent tendency for a household to buy store brands, while controlling for other causes such as price sensitivity. The model is applied to a set of ten food and nonfood product categories. We find strong evidence of correlations in household preferences for store brands across categories. Using a two-dimensional factor structure, we find that one of the factors explains a substantial amount of variation in store-brand preference, while the other factor explains price sensitivity—. The presence of these factors in all categories indicates that there are unobservable household-level traits that are non-category specific, i.e., stable across product categories. Using data from five holdout categories, we find that household estimates of these latent factors are very useful in predicting demand for store brands in new categories. Other potential applications for store managers are discussed.
    Marketing Science 01/2006; 25(1):75-90. DOI:10.1287/mksc.1050.0151 · 2.36 Impact Factor

Dataset

Download
135 Downloads
Available from
May 31, 2014