Article

Proteomic Approaches to the Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers for Early Detection and Personalized Medicine.

Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan.
Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 1.9). 12/2012; DOI: 10.1093/jjco/hys200
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cancer biomarkers for the early detection of malignancies and selection of therapeutic strategies have been requested in the clinical field. Accurate and informative cancer biomarkers hold significant promise for improvements in the early detection of disease and in the selection of the most effective therapeutic strategies. Recently, significant progress in the comprehensive analysis of the human genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome has led to revolutionary changes in the discovery of cancer biomarkers. The Human Proteome Organization has launched a global Human Proteome Project to map the entire human protein set. The Human Proteome Project research group has focused on three working proteomic pillars-mass spectrometry-based, antibody-based and knowledge-based proteomics-and each of these technologies is advancing rapidly. In this review, we introduce the proteomic platforms that are currently being used for cancer biomarker discovery, and describe examples of novel cancer biomarkers that were identified with each proteomic technology.

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