Article

Psychological stress and melanoma: Are we meeting our patients' psychological needs?

School of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales. Old CCIA Building, Level 0, Sydney Children's Hospital, High Street, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. Electronic address: .
Clinics in dermatology (Impact Factor: 1.93). 01/2013; 31(1):41-6. DOI: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2011.11.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Approximately 30% of all patients diagnosed with melanoma report levels of psychological distress indicative of the need for clinical intervention. Despite this, the psychological and emotional needs of patients frequently go undetected and unmet. This contribution aims to provide clinicians and researchers with a succinct update on our understanding of the psychosocial challenges faced by individuals with melanoma. There is now strong evidence that psychological interventions can improve psychosocial outcomes for patients with melanoma, including reductions in general mood disturbance, depression, and anxiety. Further prospective cohort studies are required for a better understanding of the impact of psychological stress on melanoma survival and recurrence, as well as the potential psycho-neuro-immunological mechanisms involved.

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    • "The most commonly reported psychological comorbidities in melanoma patients are anxiety and depression [39] [40] [41]. Even though the true association between psychological stress, coping and melanoma survival or recurrence is uncertain [42], psychological distress in general has been related with patient delay in seeking medical advice [43] [44] decreased adherence to treatment regimes [45], lower health-related quality of life [46], greater medical costs [47] [48] and reduced engagement in post-treatment screening and preventive behaviours [49]. In the surveyed sub-cohort of melanoma patients, anxiety, depression and QoL mean scores were found to be comparable to the general population. "
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    • "The most commonly reported psychological comorbidities in melanoma patients are anxiety and depression [39] [40] [41]. Even though the true association between psychological stress, coping and melanoma survival or recurrence is uncertain [42], psychological distress in general has been related with patient delay in seeking medical advice [43] [44] decreased adherence to treatment regimes [45], lower health-related quality of life [46], greater medical costs [47] [48] and reduced engagement in post-treatment screening and preventive behaviours [49]. In the surveyed sub-cohort of melanoma patients, anxiety, depression and QoL mean scores were found to be comparable to the general population. "
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