Article

GBD 2010: design, definitions, and metrics.

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98121, USA. Electronic address: .
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 12/2013; 380(9859):2063-6. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61899-6
Source: PubMed
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