Article

The differentiation of embryonic stem cells seeded on electrospun nanofibers into neural lineages. Biomaterials

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1097, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA.
Biomaterials (Impact Factor: 8.31). 11/2008; 30(3):354-62. DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2008.09.046
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Due to advances in stem cell biology, embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced to differentiate into a particular mature cell lineage when cultured as embryoid bodies. Although transplantation of ES cells-derived neural progenitor cells has been demonstrated with some success for either spinal cord injury repair in small animal model, control of ES cell differentiation into complex, viable, higher ordered tissues is still challenging. Mouse ES cells have been induced to become neural progenitors by adding retinoic acid to embryoid body cultures for 4 days. In this study, we examine the use of electrospun biodegradable polymers as scaffolds not only for enhancing the differentiation of mouse ES cells into neural lineages but also for promoting and guiding the neurite outgrowth. A combination of electrospun fiber scaffolds and ES cells-derived neural progenitor cells could lead to the development of a better strategy for nerve injury repair.

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    • "A notable study by Dalby et al. showed that synthetic substrates with disordered nanoscale topographical features enhanced osteogenesis of hMSCs [49]. Substrates with highly aligned textures (e.g., microengineered grooves and electrospun fiber arrays) were utilized to enhance neuronal differentiation of murine ESCs as well as neural progenitor cells [50] [51]. Substrates composed of nanotubes were also applied for stem cell culture, with results demonstrating that hMSC osteogenesis was promoted on nanotubes with greater diameters [52]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide promising resources for regenerating tissues and organs and modeling development and diseases in vitro. To fulfill their promise, the fate, function, and organization of hPSCs need to be precisely regulated in a three-dimensional (3D) environment to mimic cellular structures and functions of native tissues and organs. In the past decade, innovations in 3D culture systems with functional biomaterials have enabled efficient and versatile control of hPSC fate at the cellular level. However, we are just at the beginning of bringing hPSC-based regeneration and development and disease modeling to the tissue and organ levels. In this review, we summarize existing bioengineered culture platforms for controlling hPSC fate and function by regulating inductive mechanical and biochemical cues coexisting in the synthetic cell microenvironment. We highlight recent excitements in developing 3D hPSC-based in vitro tissue and organ models with in vivo-like cellular structures, interactions, and functions. We further discuss an emerging multifaceted mechanotransductive signaling network - with transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ at the center stage - that regulate fates and behaviors of mammalian cells, including hPSCs. Future development of 3D biomaterial systems should incorporate dynamically modulated mechanical and chemical properties targeting specific intracellular signaling events leading to desirable hPSC fate patterning and functional tissue formation in 3D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Biomaterials 06/2015; 52. DOI:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.01.078 · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    • "A notable study by Dalby et al. showed that synthetic substrates with disordered nanoscale topographical features enhanced osteogenesis of hMSCs [49]. Substrates with highly aligned textures (e.g., microengineered grooves and electrospun fiber arrays) were utilized to enhance neuronal differentiation of murine ESCs as well as neural progenitor cells [50] [51]. Substrates composed of nanotubes were also applied for stem cell culture, with results demonstrating that hMSC osteogenesis was promoted on nanotubes with greater diameters [52]. "
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    • "Functionalisation of electrospinning polylactic acid for skin engineering E. Hoveizi et al. adhesion and proliferation (Mei et al., 2005; Chen et al., 2005; Willerth, 2009; Xie et al., 2009; Gui-Bo et al., 2010; You-Zhu, 2010; Xu et al., 2011). Degradation of scaffold plays a crucial role in tissue regeneration (Wu and Ding, 2005; Li et al., 2008). "
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