Article

Menstrual bleeding from an endometriotic lesion

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
Fertility and sterility (Impact Factor: 4.3). 11/2008; 91(5):1926-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.08.125
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We present a case in which endometriotic lesions were observed to be focally hemorrhagic at laparoscopy performed during menstruation. Red vesicular lesions likely represent early disease with intact capacity for hormonally induced menstrual bleeding.

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