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Promotion and prevention: Regulatory focus as a motivational principle

Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Impact Factor: 4.89). 01/1998; 30:1–46. DOI: 10.1016/S0065-2601(08)60381-0
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    ABSTRACT: We examine whether regulatory focus moderates the effects of task control.•We found that high promotion focus and high control facilitate performance.•In contrast, high prevention focus and high control caused dissatisfaction.•Finally, high prevention focus and low control facilitate stress reduction.
    International Journal of Psychophysiology. 12/2014; 94(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The chapter is aimed at describing four different approaches, each supported by experimental findings, which can be adopted to empower life skills in the elderly. The first approach consists in stimulating aged persons by asking them to carry out some tasks aimed at activating the brain and mental processes which are targeted by the intervention. In the second approach the elderly are hinted at thinking about their mental states to understand one's own and others' behavior to act as a reflective agent. The third approach is based on the assumption that the communication context can support and improve old people's skills, if the messages they receive are devised so to focus their attention on relevant information and to elicit relevant cognitive frameworks. According to the fourth approach, aged people can be engaged in activities which enjoy them so to express themselves in personal ways and to practice a wide set of mental functions. Becoming aware of the pros and cons of each approach enables us to choose the kind of intervention which is most suited to the elderly, taking into account the features of the context and the actual resources which can be employed. We also aim at integrating the different approaches so to devise a holistic intervention in which synergies among the methodologies to be applied occur. Introduction The steady increase in life prospects and the on-going socio-economic level of our society call for reflection about the issue of ageing and the ageing process. The elderly person is more and more seen as the protagonist in a perspective of active ageing [1], defined as the process of optimizing opportunities for participation in paths of health, safety, and socialization, which improves the quality of life and implements the potentialities for physical and mental wellbeing [2]. The classical conception of old age as characterized mainly by losses and by a decrease in individual skills, often exacerbated by the onset of diseases, has been Active Ageing and Healthy Living G. Riva et al. (Eds.) © 2014 The authors and IOS Press. This article is published online with Open Access by IOS Press and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License. doi:10.
    Active ageing and healthy living, 2014 edited by IOS Press, 01/2014: chapter Empowering Skills for an Active Ageing and Healthy Living: pages 157-171; G. Riva, P. Ajmone Marsan & C. Grassi (Eds.).
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    ABSTRACT: The present research tested whether inducing an avoidance motivation context may counteract the detrimental effects of stereotype threat among junior high school girls in physical education classes. We hypothesized that such context would fit with the goal to avoid failure triggered by stereotype threat situations. Effects of regulatory fit were investigated on performance and self-determined motivation. Eighty students were assigned to a 2 (girls or boys) × 2 (stereotype or control condition) × 2 (performance-avoidance goal or performance-approach goal context) factorial design. Among girls, results showed an interaction effect between the stereotype condition and the goal context. While inducing a performance-avoidance goal context impaired performance in the control condition, it led to increased performance and to decreased controlled motivation in the stereotype condition. No significant interaction effect was observed among boys. Overall, the results are in line with regulatory fit theory.
    Revue Internationale de Psychologie Sociale 12/2014; in press. · 0.05 Impact Factor