Article

Professionalism in the Era of Duty Hours Time for a Shift Change?

Department of Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 12/2012; 308(21):2195-6. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2012.14584
Source: PubMed
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