Article

Ischemic preconditioning and clinical scenarios.

Department of Neurology, Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Center, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.
Current opinion in neurology (Impact Factor: 5.73). 11/2012; DOI: 10.1097/WCO.0b013e32835bf200
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is gaining attention as a novel neuroprotective therapy and could provide an improved mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this article is to review the recent work in the field of IPC and its applications to clinical scenarios. RECENT FINDINGS: The cellular signaling pathways that are activated following IPC are now better understood and have enabled investigators to identify several IPC mimetics. Most of these studies were performed in rodents, and efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Additionally, remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) may have higher translational value than IPC. Repeated cycles of temporary ischemia in a remote organ can activate protective pathways in the target organ, including the heart and brain. Clinical trials are underway to test the efficacy of RIPC in protecting brain against subarachnoid hemorrhage. SUMMARY: IPC, RIPC, and IPC mimetics have the potential to be therapeutic in various clinical scenarios. Further understanding of IPC-induced neuroprotection pathways and utilization of clinically relevant animal models are necessary to increase the translational potential of IPC in the near future.

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