Article

Multiplex Targeted Sequencing Identifies Recurrently Mutated Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
Science (Impact Factor: 31.48). 11/2012; DOI: 10.1126/science.1227764
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Exome sequencing studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have identified many de novo mutations, but few recurrently disrupted genes. We therefore developed a modified molecular inversion probe method enabling ultra-low-cost candidate gene resequencing in very large cohorts. To demonstrate the power of this approach, we captured and sequenced 44 candidate genes in 2446 ASD probands. We discovered 27 de novo events in 16 genes, 59% of which are predicted to truncate proteins or disrupt splicing. We estimate that recurrent disruptive mutations in six genes-CHD8, DYRK1A, GRIN2B, TBR1, PTEN, and TBL1XR1-may contribute to 1% of sporadic ASDs. Our data support associations between specific genes and reciprocal subphenotypes (CHD8-macrocephaly, DYRK1A-microcephaly) and replicate the importance of a β-catenin/chromatin remodeling network to ASD etiology.

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