Article

Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease improve after parathyroidectomy

Section of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Surgery (Impact Factor: 3.37). 12/2012; 152(6):1232-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2012.08.051
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Primary hyperparathyroidism can be associated with symptoms related to GERD, but it is unclear which symptoms of GERD improve after parathyroidectomy. Our goal was to assess prospectively for changes in specific GERD symptoms after parathyroidectomy using a validated questionnaire.
Using the GERD health-related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire, symptoms of heartburn were prospectively assessed before and 6 months after treatment of hyperparathyroidism with parathyroidectomy. This validated questionnaire includes 10 items, with a Likert scale of 0-5. Scores range from 0 to 45, a lesser score indicates fewer/less severe symptoms.
Pre- and postoperative surveys were available for 51 patients. Parathyroidectomy improved the overall questionnaire score (12.5 ± 1.3 vs 4.5 ± 0.9, P < .0001). Overall scores for each question improved after parathyroidectomy, including symptoms of dysphagia (P = .001) and overall satisfaction with symptoms (P < .0001). However, the number of patients taking antireflux medication before and after parathyroidectomy was not substantially different (34 vs 28 patients, P = .17).
All symptoms of GERD improved after parathyroidectomy for hyperparathyroidism. Despite the decrease in symptoms, there was not a change in the number of patients who remained on anti-reflux therapy. For patients with symptoms of GERD, a trial off antireflux medications after parathyroidectomy should be considered.

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