Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease improve after parathyroidectomy

Section of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Surgery (Impact Factor: 3.38). 12/2012; 152(6):1232-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.surg.2012.08.051
Source: PubMed


Primary hyperparathyroidism can be associated with symptoms related to GERD, but it is unclear which symptoms of GERD improve after parathyroidectomy. Our goal was to assess prospectively for changes in specific GERD symptoms after parathyroidectomy using a validated questionnaire.
Using the GERD health-related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire, symptoms of heartburn were prospectively assessed before and 6 months after treatment of hyperparathyroidism with parathyroidectomy. This validated questionnaire includes 10 items, with a Likert scale of 0-5. Scores range from 0 to 45, a lesser score indicates fewer/less severe symptoms.
Pre- and postoperative surveys were available for 51 patients. Parathyroidectomy improved the overall questionnaire score (12.5 ± 1.3 vs 4.5 ± 0.9, P < .0001). Overall scores for each question improved after parathyroidectomy, including symptoms of dysphagia (P = .001) and overall satisfaction with symptoms (P < .0001). However, the number of patients taking antireflux medication before and after parathyroidectomy was not substantially different (34 vs 28 patients, P = .17).
All symptoms of GERD improved after parathyroidectomy for hyperparathyroidism. Despite the decrease in symptoms, there was not a change in the number of patients who remained on anti-reflux therapy. For patients with symptoms of GERD, a trial off antireflux medications after parathyroidectomy should be considered.

Download full-text


Available from: Haggi Mazeh,
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Classical primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) was previously a multisystemic symptomatic disorder not only with overt skeletal and renal complications but also with neuropsychological, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and rheumatic effects. The presentation of PHPT has evolved, and today most patients are asymptomatic. Osteitis fibrosa cystica is rarely seen today, and nephrolithiasis is less common. Gastrointestinal and rheumatic symptoms are not part of the clinical spectrum of modern PHPT. It remains unclear whether neuropsychological symptoms and cardiovascular disease, neither of which are currently indications for recommending parathyroidectomy (PTX), are part of the modern phenotype of PHPT. A number of observational studies suggest that mild PHPT is associated with depression, decreased quality of life, and changes in cognition, but limited data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have not indicated consistent benefits after surgery. The increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in severe PHPT has not been definitively demonstrated in mild disease, although there is some evidence for more subtle cardiovascular abnormalities, such as increased vascular stiffness, among others. Results from observational studies that have assessed the effect of PTX on cardiovascular health have been conflicting. The single RCT in this area did not demonstrate that PTX was beneficial. Despite recent progress in these areas, more data from rigorously designed studies are needed to better inform the clinical management of patients with asymptomatic PHPT.
    Journal of Clinical Densitometry 02/2013; 16(1):40-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jocd.2012.11.008 · 2.03 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to investigate the incidence of sleep disturbance and insomnia in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), and to evaluate the effect of parathyroidectomy. A questionnaire was prospectively administered to adult patients with PHPT who underwent curative parathyroidectomy over an 11-month period. The questionnaire, administered preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively, included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and eight additional questions regarding sleep pattern. Total ISI scores range from 0 to 28, with >7 signifying sleep difficulties and scores >14 indicating clinical insomnia. Of 197 eligible patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for PHPT, 115 (58.3 %) completed the preoperative and postoperative questionnaires. The mean age was 60.0 ± 1.2 years and 80.0 % were women. Preoperatively, 72 patients (62.6 %) had sleep difficulties, and 29 patients (25.2 %) met the criteria for clinical insomnia. Clinicopathologic variables were not predictive of clinical insomnia. There was a significant reduction in mean ISI score after parathyroidectomy (10.3 ± 0.6 vs 6.2 ± 0.5, p < 0.0001). Postoperatively, 79 patients (68.7 %) had an improved ISI score. Of the 29 patients with preoperative clinical insomnia, 21 (72.4 %) had resolution after parathyroidectomy. Preoperative insomnia patients had an increase in total hours slept after parathyroidectomy (5.4 ± 0.3 vs 6.1 ± 0.3 h, p = 0.02), whereas both insomnia patients and non-insomnia patients had a decrease in the number of awakenings (3.7 ± 0.4 vs 1.9 ± 0.2 times, p = 0.0001). Sleep disturbances and insomnia are common in patients with PHPT, and the majority of patients will improve after curative parathyroidectomy.
    World Journal of Surgery 10/2013; 38(3). DOI:10.1007/s00268-013-2285-1 · 2.64 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In minimally invasive surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT), intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) monitoring assists in obtaining demonstrably better outcomes, but optimal criteria are controversial. The outcomes of 1,108 initial parathyroid operations for sporadic HPT using IOPTH monitoring from 1997 to 2011 were stratified by final post-resection IOPTH level. All patients had adequate follow-up to verify cure. With mean follow-up of 1.8 years (range 0.5-14.3 years), parathyroidectomy using IOPTH monitoring failed in 1.2 % of cases, with an additional 0.5 % incidence of long-term recurrence at a mean of 3.2 years (range 0.8-6.8 years) postoperatively. Operative success was equally likely with a final IOPTH drop to 41-65 pg/mL vs ≤40 pg/mL (p = 1). In the 76 patients with an elevated baseline IOPTH level that did not drop to ≤65 pg/mL, surgical failure was 43 times more likely than with a drop into normal range (13 vs. 0.3 %; p < 0.001). When the final IOPTH level dropped by >50 % but not into the normal range, surgical failure was 19 times more likely (3.8 vs. 0.2 %; p = 0.015). Long-term recurrence was more likely in patients with a final IOPTH level of 41-65 pg/mL than with a level ≤40 pg/mL (1.2 vs. 0; p = 0.016). Adjunctive intraoperative PTH monitoring facilitates a high cure rate for initial surgery of sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism. A final IOPTH level that is within the normal range and drops by >50 % from baseline is a strong predictor of operative success. Patients with a final IOPTH level between 41-65 pg/mL should be followed beyond 6 months for long-term recurrence.
    World Journal of Surgery 11/2013; 38(3). DOI:10.1007/s00268-013-2329-6 · 2.64 Impact Factor
Show more