Article

Intuition's Powers and Perils

Psychological Inquiry (Impact Factor: 6.65). 10/2010; 21:371-377. DOI: 10.1080/1047840X.2010.524469

ABSTRACT One of the biggest revelations of recent psychological science is the two-track human mind, which features not only a deliberate, self-aware “high road” but also a vast, automatic, intuitive “low road.” Through experience, we learn associations that provide fast and frugal intuitions that enable instantaneous social judgments and the pattern recognition that marks acquired expertise. But as studies of implicit prejudice and intuitive fears illustrate, unchecked gut feelings can also lead us astray. Intuition's powers and perils appear in various realms, from sports to business to clinical and interviewer judgments.

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