Article

Structure of the pre-60S ribosomal subunit with nuclear export factor Arx1 bound at the exit tunnel

1] Biochemistry Center, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. [2].
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology (Impact Factor: 11.63). 11/2012; 19(12). DOI: 10.1038/nsmb.2438
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Preribosomal particles evolve in the nucleus through transient interaction with biogenesis factors before export to the cytoplasm. Here, we report the architecture of the late pre-60S particle, purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, through Arx1, a nuclear export factor with structural homology to methionine aminopeptidases, or its binding partner Alb1. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the Arx1 particle at 11.9-Å resolution reveals regions of extra density on the pre-60S particle attributed to associated biogenesis factors, confirming the immature state of the nascent subunit. One of these densities could be unambiguously assigned to Arx1. Immunoelectron microscopy and UV cross-linking localize Arx1 close to the ribosomal exit tunnel, in direct contact with ES27, a highly dynamic eukaryotic rRNA expansion segment. The binding of Arx1 at the exit tunnel may position this export factor to prevent premature recruitment of ribosome-associated factors active during translation.

Full-text

Available from: Sander Granneman, May 15, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
204 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: NPMs correspond to the first modifications which any protein may undergo.•NPMs involve the N-terminal methionine excision pathway, N-α-acetylation and N-myristoylation.•NPM enzymes can be classified into several groups with specific features.•N-α-acetyltransferases and N-myristoyltransferases share a common GNAT fold.•Interaction with ribosome has been shown for several NPM enzymes.
    Biochimie 11/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.biochi.2014.11.008 · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders.
    12/2014; DOI:10.4161/21690731.2014.975018
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 84 is June 02, 2015. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.