Article

Developing an international network for Alzheimer research: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network.

the Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA (RM), the Mental Health Research Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (CM), and Neuroscience Research Australia and the School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (PS) - all in Australia
Clinical investigation 10/2012; 2(10):975-984. DOI: 10.4155/cli.12.93
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a collaborative effort of international Alzheimer disease (AD) centers that are conducting a multifaceted prospective biomarker study in individuals at-risk for autosomal dominant AD (ADAD). DIAN collects comprehensive information and tissue in accordance with standard protocols from asymptomatic and symptomatic ADAD mutation carriers and their non-carrier family members to determine the pathochronology of clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers of AD. This article describes the structure, implementation, and underlying principles of DIAN, as well as the demographic features of the initial DIAN cohort.

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