Article

Aptamer-Functionalized, Ultra-Small, Monodisperse Silica Nanoconjugates for Targeted Dual-Modal Imaging of Lymph Nodes with Metastatic Tumors

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1304 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL, 61801 (USA).
Angewandte Chemie International Edition (Impact Factor: 11.34). 12/2012; 51(51). DOI: 10.1002/anie.201205271
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT A dual-modal imaging probe based on size-controlled silica nanoconjugates was synthesized for targeted imaging of lymph nodes by means of both PET and near infrared fluorescence techniques. 20 nm nanoconjugates functionalized with an aptamer (green triangles) that targets 4T1 breast cancer cells improved the detection efficiency of sentinel lymph nodes with metastatic tumors.

0 Followers
 · 
117 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The sol-gel process provides a robust and versatile technology for the immobilization of biologicals. A wide range of inorganic, composites and hybrid materials can be prepared to encapsulate molecular drugs, proteins, antibodies/antigens, enzymes, nucleic acids, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells into bulk gels, particles and films. This review describes the applications of sol-gel encapsulation relevant to medicinal chemistry focusing on the recent development of biosensors as well as systems for production, screening and delivery of bioactive compounds and biomaterials.
    Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry 02/2015; 15(3):223-244. DOI:10.2174/1568026614666141229112734 · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment.
    Theranostics 5(4):322-344. DOI:10.7150/thno.10257 · 7.83 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nanomedicines (NMs) offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. However, extension of progression-free interval and overall survival time achieved by Food and Drug Administration-approved NMs remain modest. To develop next generation NMs to achieve superior anticancer activities, it is crucial to investigate and understand the correlation between the physicochemical properties of NMs (particle size in particular) and their interactions with biological systems to establish criteria for NM optimization. Here, we systematically evaluated the size-dependent biological profiles of three monodisperse drug-silica nanoconjugates (NCs; 20, 50, and 200 nm) through both experiments and mathematical modeling and aimed to identify the optimal size for the most effective anticancer drug delivery. Among the three NCs investigated, the 50-nm NC shows the highest tumor tissue retention integrated over time, which is the collective outcome of deep tumor tissue penetration and efficient cancer cell internalization as well as slow tumor clearance, and thus, the highest efficacy against both primary and metastatic tumors in vivo.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 10/2014; 111(43). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1411499111 · 9.81 Impact Factor

Full-text

Download
195 Downloads
Available from
May 22, 2014