Article

Can the Food Industry Play a Constructive Role in the Obesity Epidemic?

Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association (Impact Factor: 30.39). 11/2008; 300(15):1808-11. DOI: 10.1001/jama.300.15.1808
Source: PubMed
0 Followers
 · 
364 Views
 · 
4 Downloads
  • Source
    • "There is less agreement (and little comparative evidence) on the relative effectiveness of alternative public intervention strategies (Cecchini et al., 2010; Beaglehole et al., 2011; Brambila-Macias et al., 2011; Capacci et al., 2012). While there is broad support for policies aimed at protecting children (Evans et al., 2005), conflicting views are especially found for those policies that are regarded as more intrusive, such as taxes on unhealthy food and drinks (Jacobson and Brownell, 2000; Leicester and Windmeijer, 2004; Caraher and Cowburn, 2005; Brownell and Frieden, 2009), restrictions on advertising (Zywicki et al., 2004; Veerman et al., 2009), or the imposition of label requirements or nutrition standards on the food industry (Grunert and Wills, 2007; Lang and Rayner, 2007; Ludwig and Nestle, 2008; Variyam, 2008; Capacci et al., 2012) compared with less intrusive choices like informing consumers through social marketing (Grier and Bryant, 2005; Lang and Rayner, 2010), targeting school children through education measures or school meal standards (Story, 1999; Cawley, 2006), and especially public–private partnerships such as the UK Responsibility Deal (Crockett and Kennedy, 2002). Together with their health benefits, healthy eating policies involve explicit or implicit economic costs to the taxpayer. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: World Health Organization estimates that obesity accounts for 2-8% of health care costs in different parts of Europe, and highlights a key role for national policymaking in curbing the epidemic. A variety of healthy-eating policy instruments are available, ranging from more paternalistic policies to those less intrusive. Our aim is to measure and explain the level of public support for different types of healthy eating policy in Europe, based on data from a probabilistic sample of 3003 respondents in five European countries. We find that the main drivers of policy support are attitudinal factors, especially attribution of obesity to excessive availability of unhealthy foods, while socio-demographic characteristics and political preferences have little explanatory power. A high level of support for healthy eating policy does not translate into acceptance of higher taxes to fund them, however.
    Health Economics Policy and Law 07/2015; 10(3):267-292. DOI:10.1017/S1744133114000346 · 1.33 Impact Factor
    • "This is true for debates around weaning foods as much as it is for debates about processed foods in general. There are environmental relationships also to be considered (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, 2007); however, the major battle about food vs processed food is not pursued further here (Ludwig and Nestle, 2008; Monteiro and Cannon, 2012; Monteiro et al., 2010, 2011, 2013; Nestle, 2007a,b; Pollan, 2006a,b, 2010; Woolf and Nestle, 2008) though elements of this affect weight gain, obesity and all other major noncommunicable diseases (Mozaffarian et al., 2011; Mozaffarian, 2010; Willett, 2001, 2006). This side battle focuses the food only push vs those who focus on improving the quality of what is already purchased (Rayner et al., 2013; Roodenburg et al., 2011; Sacks et al., 2011; Wartella et al., 2010). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The entire food value chain and diet of low and middle income countries (LMICs) are rapidly shifting. Many of the issues addressed by the nutrition community ignore some of the major underlying shifts in purchases of consumer packaged foods and beverages. At the same time, the drivers of the food system at the farm level might be changing. There is a need for the agriculture and nutrition communities to understand these changes and focus on some of their implications for health. This rapid growth of the retail sector will change the diets of the food insecure as much as that of the food secure across rural and urban LMIC’s. This short commentary contents that current research, programs and policies are ignoring these rapid dynamic shifts.
    Food Policy 08/2014; 47:91–96. DOI:10.1016/j.foodpol.2014.05.001 · 2.33 Impact Factor
  • Source
    • "In reaction, food companies have started to take steps, including changes in package-size, portions and recipes, and the provision of nutrition information through labels (Kolk et al., 2012; Wansink and Huckabee, 2005). However, as the food industry is currently producing more than the population needs and profits rely on increasing consumption (Ludwig and Nestle, 2008), many people believe that its CSR activities are limited and have focused on transferring responsibility to personal will power (e.g., Koplan and Brownell, 2010), resulting in negative responses towards these initiatives. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To contribute to the debate on the role of social media in responsible business, this article explores blogger buzz in reaction to food companies’ press releases on health and obesity issues, considering the content and the level of fit between the CSR initiatives and the company. Findings show that companies issued more product-related initiatives than promotion-related ones. Among these, less than half generated a substantial number of responses from bloggers, which could not be identified as a specific group. While new product introductions led to positive buzz, modifications of current products resulted in more negative responses, even if there was a high fit with core business. While promotion-related press releases were received negatively in general, particularly periphery promotion (compared to core promotion) generated most reactions. Our exploratory study suggests that companies can increase the likelihood of a positive reaction if they carefully consider the fit between initiatives and their core business, while taking the notion of ‘controversial fit,’ relating to the unhealthy nature of original products, into account. Further research avenues and implications, as well as limitations, are discussed.
    Journal of Business Ethics 12/2013; 118(4):695-707. DOI:10.1007/s10551-013-1955-0 · 1.33 Impact Factor
Show more

Preview

Download
4 Downloads
Available from