Article

Money boys, HIV risks, and the associations between norms and safer sex: a respondent-driven sampling study in Shenzhen, China.

Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 1000 East Clay Street, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.
AIDS and Behavior (Impact Factor: 3.49). 11/2008; 13(4):652-62. DOI: 10.1007/s10461-008-9475-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Money boys (MBs) are male sex workers who sell sex to men who have sex with men (MSM). This study estimates the proportion of MBs in the Chinese MSM, compares HIV risks between MBs and non-MB MSM, and examines the associations between practicing safer sex and peer norms of condom use. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to sample 351 MSM in the city of Shenzhen in 2007. The RDS-adjusted proportion of MBs among MSM was 9%. Compared to non-MB MSM, more MBs reported having had multiple male and female sexual partners. Half of MBs and non-MB MSM had consistently used condoms. Both descriptive and subjective norms were positively associated with condom use. The MB proportion of 9% in MSM implies a relatively large population of MBs in China. The association between peer norms and consistent condom use can assist with the development of culturally competent HIV interventions that promote safer sex.

0 Followers
 · 
110 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Male sex workers who sell or exchange sex for money or goods encompass a very diverse population across and within countries worldwide. Information characterising their practices, contexts where they live, and their needs is limited, because these individuals are generally included as a subset of larger studies focused on gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) or even female sex workers. Male sex workers, irrespective of their sexual orientation, mostly offer sex to men and rarely identify as sex workers, using local or international terms instead. Growing evidence indicates a sustained or increasing burden of HIV among some male sex workers within the context of the slowing global HIV pandemic. Several synergistic facilitators could be potentiating HIV acquisition and transmission among male sex workers, including biological, behavioural, and structural determinants. Criminalisation and intersectional stigmas of same-sex practices, commercial sex, and HIV all augment risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among male sex workers and reduce the likelihood of these people accessing essential services. These contexts, taken together with complex sexual networks among male sex workers, define this group as a key population underserved by current HIV prevention, treatment, and care services. Dedicated efforts are needed to make those services available for the sake of both public health and human rights. Evidence-based and human rights-affirming services dedicated specifically to male sex workers are needed to improve health outcomes for these men and the people within their sexual networks.
    The Lancet 07/2014; DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60801-1 · 39.21 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Behavioral interventions (BIs) remained the cornerstone of HIV prevention in resource-limited settings. One of the major concerns for such efforts is the loss-to-follow-up (LTFU) that threatens almost every HIV control program involving high-risk population groups. Methods To evaluate the factors associated with LTFU during BIs and HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM), 410 HIV sero-negatives MSM were recruited using respondent driven sampling (RDS) in Nanjing, China during 2008, they were further followed for 18 months. At baseline and each follow-up visits, each participant was counseled about various HIV risk-reductions BIs at a designated sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic. Results Among 410 participants recruited at baseline, altogether 221 (53.9%) were LTFU at the 18-month follow-up visit. Overall, 46 participants were found to be positive for syphilis infection at baseline while 13 participants were HIV sero-converted during the follow-up period. Increasing age was less (Adjusted Odds Ratio(aOR) of 0.90, 95% confidence Interval (CI) 0.86–0.94) and official residency of provinces other than Nanjing (AOR of 2.49, 95%CI 1.32–4.71), lower level of education (AOR of 2.01, 95%CI 1.10–3.66) and small social network size (AOR of 1.75, 95%CI 1.09–2.80) were more likely to be associated with higher odds of LTFU. Conclusion To improve retention in the programs for HIV control, counseling and testing among MSM in Nanjing, focused intensified intervention targeting those who were more likely to be LTFU, especially the young, less educated, unofficial residents of Nanjing who had smaller social network size, might be helpful.
    PLoS ONE 01/2015; 10(1). DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0115691 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explore parental disclosure practices and perceptions among HIV-positive parents in urban China, we conducted in-depth interviews with 29 HIV-positive parents in Beijing in 2011. The disclosure rate was low (17%), and unplanned disclosure was common. Most parents chose not to disclose because of concerns regarding their children's young age, concerns about potentially negative psychological impacts on the children, potential secondary disclosure by the children to others, and perceived stigma associated with HIV infection and the causes of such infection (e.g., homosexual behaviors). Parents considered that an appropriate disclosure should be well-planned, cautious, and a gradual process conducted in a comfortable and relaxed environment when both parents and children were calm. We concluded that it was important to (a) provide professional guidance and services about disclosure to children for HIV-positive parents in China, (b) reduce or eliminate HIV-related stigma, (c) set up support groups among HIV-positive parents, and (d) tailor disclosure strategies for different populations of various demographic and socioeconomic characteristics.
    Qualitative Health Research 07/2014; 24(9). DOI:10.1177/1049732314544967 · 2.19 Impact Factor