Article

Glutaminyl cyclase inhibition attenuates pyroglutamate A beta and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology

Probiodrug AG, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle/S., Germany.
Nature medicine (Impact Factor: 28.05). 11/2008; 14(10):1106-11. DOI: 10.1038/nm.1872
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Because of their abundance, resistance to proteolysis, rapid aggregation and neurotoxicity, N-terminally truncated and, in particular, pyroglutamate (pE)-modified Abeta peptides have been suggested as being important in the initiation of pathological cascades resulting in the development of Alzheimer's disease. We found that the N-terminal pE-formation is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclase in vivo. Glutaminyl cyclase expression was upregulated in the cortices of individuals with Alzheimer's disease and correlated with the appearance of pE-modified Abeta. Oral application of a glutaminyl cyclase inhibitor resulted in reduced Abeta(3(pE)-42) burden in two different transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and in a new Drosophila model. Treatment of mice was accompanied by reductions in Abeta(x-40/42), diminished plaque formation and gliosis and improved performance in context memory and spatial learning tests. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that Abeta(3(pE)-42) acts as a seed for Abeta aggregation by self-aggregation and co-aggregation with Abeta(1-40/42). Therefore, Abeta(3(pE)-40/42) peptides seem to represent Abeta forms with exceptional potency for disturbing neuronal function. The reduction of brain pE-Abeta by inhibition of glutaminyl cyclase offers a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and provides implications for other amyloidoses, such as familial Danish dementia.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
197 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are characterized by deposits of Abeta peptides and by accompanying chronic inflammation. Here, we provide evidence that the enzyme isoglutaminyl cyclase (isoQC) is a novel factor contributing to both aspects of AD pathology. Two putative substrates of isoQC, N-truncated Abeta peptides and the monocyte chemoattractant chemokine CCL2, undergo isoQC-catalyzed pyroglutamate (pGlu) modification. This triggers Abeta aggregation and facilitates the biological activity of CCL2, which collectively results in the formation of high molecular weight Abeta aggregates, glial cell activation, neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death. In mouse brain, we found isoQC to be neuron-specifically expressed in neocortical, hippocampal and subcortical structures, localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus as well as co-expressed with its substrate CCL2. In aged APP transgenic Tg2576 mice, both isoQC and CCL2 mRNA levels are up-regulated and isoQC and CCL2 proteins were found to be co-induced in Abeta plaque-associated reactive astrocytes. Also, in mouse primary astrocyte culture, a simultaneous up-regulation of isoQC and CCL2 expression was revealed upon Abeta and pGlu-Abeta stimulation. In brains of AD patients, the expression of isoQC and CCL2 mRNA and protein is up-regulated compared to controls and correlates with pGlu-Abeta load and with the decline in mini-mental state examination. Our observations provide evidence for a dual involvement of isoQC in AD pathogenesis by catalysis of pGlu-Abeta and pGlu-CCL2 formation which mutually stimulate inflammatory events and affect cognition. We conclude that isoQC inhibition may target both major pathological events in the development of AD.
    Acta Neuropathologica 02/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00401-015-1395-2 · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by β-amyloid plaques and intraneuronal τ aggregation usually associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Both β-amyloid plaques and CAA deposits contain fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ plaques and CAA develop first in neocortical areas of preclinical AD patients and, then, expand in a characteristic sequence into further brain regions with end-stage pathology in symptomatic AD patients. Aβ aggregates are not restricted to amyloid plaques and CAA. Soluble and several types of insoluble non-plaque- and non-CAA-associated Aβ aggregates have been described. Amyloid fibrils are products of a complex self-assembly process that involves different types of transient intermediates. Amongst these intermediate species are protofibrils and oligomers. Different variants of Aβ peptides may result from alternative processing or from mutations that lead to rare forms of familial AD. These variants can exhibit different self-assembly and aggregation properties. In addition, several post-translational modifications of Aβ have been described that result, for example, in the production of N-terminal truncated Aβ with pyroglutamate modification at position 3 (AβN3pE) or of Aβ phosphorylated at serine 8 (pSer8Aβ). Both AβN3pE and pSer8Aβ show enhanced aggregation into oligomers and fibrils. However, the earliest detectable soluble and insoluble Aβ aggregates in the human brain exhibit non-modified Aβ, whereas AβN3pE and pSer8Aβ are detected in later stages. This finding indicates the existence of different biochemical stages of Aβ aggregate maturation with pSer8Aβ being related mainly to cases with symptomatic AD. The conversion from preclinical to symptomatic AD could thereby be related to combined effects of increased Aβ concentration, maturation of aggregates and spread of deposits into additional brain regions. Thus, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and maturation before entering the symptomatic stage of the disease as indicated by the accumulation of pSer8Aβ may represent an attractive treatment strategy for preventing disease progression.
    Acta Neuropathologica 12/2014; 129(2). DOI:10.1007/s00401-014-1375-y · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aging is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus is a hallmark of AD. Many factors have been identified as causative elements for onset and progression of AD; for instance, tau seems to mediate the neuronal toxicity of Aβ, and downregulation of macroautophagy (autophagy) is thought to be a causative element of AD pathology. Expression of autophagy-related genes is reduced with age, which leads to increases in oxidative stress and aberrant protein accumulation. In this study, we found that expression of the autophagy-related genes atg1, atg8a, and atg18 in Drosophila melanogaster was regulated with aging as well as their own activities. In addition, the level of atg18 was maintained by dfoxo (foxo) and dsir2 (sir2) activities in concert with aging. These results indicate that some autophagy-related gene expression is regulated by foxo/sir2-mediated aging processes. We further found that reduced autophagy activity correlated with late-onset neuronal dysfunction caused by neuronal induction of Aβ. These data support the idea that age-related dysfunction of autophagy is a causative element in onset and progression of AD.

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
79 Downloads
Available from
Jun 3, 2014