Article

The changing face of HIV in China.

Yunnan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yunnan, People's Republic of China.
Nature (Impact Factor: 42.35). 11/2008; 455(7213):609-11. DOI: 10.1038/455609a
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT HIV has advanced from high-risk groups such as intravenous drug users to some in the general population, according to comprehensive new data from the south of China. What needs to be done to halt its spread?

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