Article

Role of Ebola virus VP30 in transcription reinitiation.

INSERM, U758, Filovirus Laboratory, 21 Av. Tony Garnier, 69365 Lyon, Cedex 07, France.
Journal of Virology (Impact Factor: 5.08). 11/2008; 82(24):12569-73. DOI: 10.1128/JVI.01395-08
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT VP30 is a phosphoprotein essential for the initiation of Ebola virus transcription. In this work, we have studied the effect of mutations in VP30 phosphorylation sites on the ebolavirus replication cycle by using a reverse genetics system. We demonstrate that VP30 is involved in reinitiation of gene transcription and that this activity is affected by mutations at the phosphorylation sites.

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Aug 29, 2014

Nadine Biedenkopf