Article

NRED: a database of long noncoding RNA expression

ARC Special Research Centre for Functional and Applied Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia.
Nucleic Acids Research (Impact Factor: 9.11). 11/2008; 37(Database issue):D122-6. DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkn617
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT In mammals, thousands of long non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) (>200 nt) have recently been described. However, the biological significance and function of the vast majority of these transcripts remain unclear. We have constructed a public repository, the Noncoding RNA Expression Database (NRED), which provides gene expression information for thousands of long ncRNAs in human and mouse. The database contains both microarray and in situ hybridization data, much of which is described here for the first time. NRED also supplies a rich tapestry of ancillary information for featured ncRNAs, including evolutionary conservation, secondary structure evidence, genomic context links and antisense relationships. The database is available at http://jsm-research.imb.uq.edu.au/NRED, and the web interface enables both advanced searches and data downloads. Taken together, NRED should significantly advance the study and understanding of long ncRNAs, and provides a timely and valuable resource to the scientific community.

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Available from: Marcel Dinger, Jul 07, 2015
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