Article

Operating room management and operating room productivity: the case of Germany.

Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Operative Intensivmedizin, Universitätsklinikum Mannheim gGmbH, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim, Germany.
Health Care Management Science (Impact Factor: 1.05). 10/2008; 11(3):228-39. DOI: 10.1007/s10729-007-9042-7
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We examine operating room productivity on the example of hospitals in Germany with independent anesthesiology departments. Linked to anesthesiology group literature, we use the ln(Total Surgical Time/Total Anesthesiologists Salary) as a proxy for operating room productivity. We test the association between operating room productivity and different structural, organizational and management characteristics based on survey data from 87 hospitals. Our empirical analysis links improved operating room productivity to greater operating room capacity, appropriate scheduling behavior and management methods to realign interests. From this analysis, the enforcing jurisdiction and avoiding advance over-scheduling appear to be the implementable tools for improving operating room productivity.

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