Article

Measurement of suprathreshold binocular interactions in amblyopia.

McGill Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, McGill University, 687 Pine Ave W (H4-14), Montreal, Que., Canada PQ H3A 1A1.
Vision research (Impact Factor: 2.29). 09/2008; 48(28):2775-84. DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2008.09.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT It has been established that in amblyopia, information from the amblyopic eye (AME) is not combined with that from the fellow fixing eye (FFE) under conditions of binocular viewing. However, recent evidence suggests that mechanisms that combine information between the eyes are intact in amblyopia. The lack of binocular function is most likely due to the imbalanced inputs from the two eyes under binocular conditions [Baker, D. H., Meese, T. S., Mansouri, B., & Hess, R. F. (2007b). Binocular summation of contrast remains intact in strabismic amblyopia. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 48(11), 5332-5338]. We have measured the extent to which the information presented to each eye needs to differ for binocular combination to occur and in doing so we quantify the influence of interocular suppression. We quantify these suppressive effects for suprathreshold processing of global stimuli for both motion and spatial tasks. The results confirm the general importance of these suppressive effects in rendering the structurally binocular visual system of a strabismic amblyope, functionally monocular.

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