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Returns of the Living Dead Therapeutic Action of Irradiated and Mitotically Inactivated Embryonic Stem Cells

Lorry I. Lokey Stem Cell Research Bldg, Room G1120, Stanford, CA. or .
Circulation Research (Impact Factor: 11.09). 10/2012; 111(10):1250-2. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.112.279398
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