Article

Aging of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche.

Department of Physiology and Neurobiology
Aging and disease 02/2011; 2(1):49-63.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The persistence of an active subventricular zone neural stem cell niche in the adult mammalian forebrain supports its continued role in the production of new neurons and in generating cells to function in repair through adulthood. Unfortunately, with increasing age the niche begins to deteriorate, compromising these functions. The reasons for this decline are not clear. Studies are beginning to define the molecular and physiologic changes in the microenvironment of the aging subventricular zone niche. New revelations from aging studies will allow for a more thorough understanding of which reparative functions are lost in the aged brain, the progression of niche demise and the possibility for therauptic intervention to improve aging brain function.

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Available from: Joanne Conover, Apr 02, 2015
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