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Echolocation by Insect-Eating Bats

[ "Hans-Ulrich Schnitzler () is professor and head of the Lehrstuhl Tierphysiologie of the University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 28, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany."]; [ "Elisabeth Kalko is professor and head of the Abteilung Experimentelle Ökologie of the University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D89069 Ulm. E. Kalko is a staff member and H.-U. Schnitzler is a research associate of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama. E. Kalko is also a research associate at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC."]
BioScience (Impact Factor: 4.74). 09/2009; DOI:10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051[0557:EBIEB]2.0.CO;2
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