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Natural Enemies Managing the Invasion of the Fig Whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), Infesting a Ficus benjamina Hedge

[ "University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Indian River Research and Education Center, 2199 South Rock Road, Fort Pierce, FL 34945"]; [ "Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, 33031"]; [ "USDA, ARS, U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory, Subtropical Insect Research Unit, 2001 S. Rock Rd., Ft. Pierce, FL 34945"]; [ "Mid Florida Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Apopka, FL 32703"]
Florida Entomologist (Impact Factor: 1.16). 10/2011; DOI:10.1653/024.094.0338
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