Article

Impact of 111In-DTPA-octreotide SPECT/CT fusion images in the management of neuroendocrine tumours.

Istituto di Medicina Nucleare, Dipartimento di Bioimmagini e Scienze Radiologiche, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, L.go A. Gemelli 8, 00168 Roma, Italy.
La radiologia medica (Impact Factor: 1.37). 10/2008; 113(7):1056-67. DOI: 10.1007/s11547-008-0319-9
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with [(111)In]-diethylene triamine pentaacetate acid (DTPA)-octreotide is an accurate method for detecting neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) but often does not provide clear anatomical localisation of lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of anatomical-functional image fusion.
Fifty-four patients with known or suspected NET were included in the study. Planar and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was performed using a dual-head gamma camera equipped with an integrated X-ray transmission system, and the images were first interpreted alone by two nuclear medicine physicians and then compared with SPECT/CT fusion images together with a radiologist. The improvement provided by SPECT/CT in the interpretation of SPECT data alone and any modification in patient management were recorded.
Fusion images improved SPECT interpretation in 23 cases, providing precise anatomical localisation of increased tracer uptake in 20 cases and disease exclusion in sites of physiological uptake in 5. In 10 patients, SPECT/CT allowed definition of the functional significance of lesions detected by diagnostic CT. SPECT/CT data modified clinical management in 14 cases by changing the diagnostic approach in 8 and the therapeutic modality in 6.
Our study demonstrates that image fusion is clearly superior to SPECT alone, allowing precise localisation of lesions and reducing false-positive results.

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Available from: Giorgio Treglia, Jun 13, 2015
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