Article

GLP-1 analog attenuates cocaine reward.

Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.
Molecular Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 15.15). 10/2012; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2012.141
Source: PubMed
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