Article

Laparoscopic and minimally invasive resection of malignant colorectal disease.

Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53792-7375, USA.
Surgical Clinics of North America (Impact Factor: 1.93). 11/2008; 88(5):1047-72, vii. DOI: 10.1016/j.suc.2008.05.009
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Minimally invasive surgery for colorectal cancer is a burgeoning field of general surgery. Randomized controlled trials have assessed short-term patient-oriented and long-term oncologic outcomes for laparoscopic resection. These trials have demonstrated that the laparoscopic approach is equivalent to open surgery with a shorter hospital stay. Laparoscopic resection also may result in improved short-term patient-oriented outcomes and equivalent oncologic resections versus the open approach. Transanal excision of select rectal cancer using endoscopic microsurgery is promising and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery is an emerging modality. The efficacy of minimally invasive treatment for rectal cancer compared with conventional approaches will be clarified further in randomized controlled trials.

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