Article

Answering the joining forces call: integrating woman veteran care into nursing simulations.

Author Affiliations: Associate Professor (Dr Harmer) and Assistant Professor (Ms Huffman), Department of Nursing, Saginaw Valley State University, University Center, Michigan.
Nurse educator (Impact Factor: 0.67). 11/2012; 37(6):237-41. DOI: 10.1097/NNE.0b013e31826f2c39
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Joining Forces is a national undertaking asking for a commitment from nurses to serve military members, veterans, and their family members. However, given the content saturation concerns so common in nursing curricula, how can educators ensure this content is in their curricula without overburdening their faculty or students? The authors provide suggestions on how to modify existing simulations to incorporate veteran care. These suggestions can easily be incorporated into simulations for nursing schools, hospitals, or outpatient care settings.

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