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Mentor programs: Making the right moves.

ABSTRACT Mentoring programs can serve to provide junior-level managers with both technical and interpersonal skills, instruct them in the ways of the corporate culture, and acclimate the protégé to the values and expectations of the company. The development of a mentor program is discussed in relation to the program goals, criteria for selection, and methods of mentor/protégé interaction. Recommendations include communication of program goals to all participants, continuous evaluation, and the use of a long-term test period. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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