Article

American College Health Association National College Health Assessment Spring 2006 Reference Group Data Report (Abridged)

Journal of American College Health (Impact Factor: 1.45). 01/1970; 55(4):195-206. DOI: 10.3200/JACH.55.4.195-206

ABSTRACT Objective: Assessing and understanding the health needs and capacities of college students is paramount to creating healthy campus communities. The American College Health Association--National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) is a survey developed by the ACHA in 1998 to assist institutions of higher education in achieving this goal. The ACHA-NCHA contains approximately 300 questions assessing student health status and health problems, risk and protective behaviors, and impediments to academic performance. Participants: The Spring 2006 Reference Group includes ACHA-NCHA data from 94,806 students at 117 institutions of higher education. Method Summary: Officials at participating institutions administered the ACHA-NCHA to all students, to randomly selected students, or to students in randomly selected classrooms. Data were collected between January and May 2006. Results: Results from the Spring 2006 Reference Group (N = 94,806) are presented. Conclusions: Data from the ACHA-NCHA Spring 2006 Reference Group expand the understanding of the health needs and capacities of college students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

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