Article

Optical coherence tomography of the anterior segment.

Centre for Contact Lens Research, School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
The ocular surface (Impact Factor: 4.21). 08/2008; 6(3):117-27. DOI: 10.1016/S1542-0124(12)70280-X
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Perhaps no diagnostic technology has emerged as rapidly in ophthalmology as optical coherence tomography (OCT). A single clinical device for this noninvasive imaging technique was first released in 1996, and now at least ten clinical devices are available. Although the first clinical anterior segment OCT was marketed only 2 years ago, a substantial amount of work has been done using modified retinal imagers or prototype laboratory-based imagers. In this review, we discuss OCT imaging primarily of the cornea. We also highlight previous and current publications on nonclinical and clinical uses of the device to illustrate how anterior segment OCT can be used to understand corneal structure and function in health and disease.

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