Article

Gene Expression Analysis As a Tool in Early-Stage Oral Cancer Management

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
Journal of Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 18.43). 10/2012; 30(33). DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2012.44.8050
Source: PubMed
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